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20121101
20121130
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
you talk to them they seem determined to speak out against mr. morsi's controversial decrees. >> the beginning avenue era for a tyrant. >> he's saying that nobody can revise what i say. he's actually throwing the new system out of the scene. >> reporter: big developments in meeting rooms and news conferences on saturday where factions posed to mr. morsi made moves to put pressure on the president. of course a number of his decrees seem to weaken the judiciary. the judiciary answered back on saturday by calling for a nationwide judge's strike. also the supreme judicial council on saturday made a statement declaring his decrease an attack on the independence of the judiciary. opposing factions also called for a 1 million man protest and sit in on tuesday. what this mr. morsi's muslim brotherhood group do? they call for a 1 million man protest too on tuesday. some critical days ahead for this country. >>> in this country the hollywood walk of fame is decorated with flowers honoring larry hagman. it is a tribute to the legendary film and television actor who tied yesterday at a h
the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few months without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, fredricka, that people here are outraged about. they're describe this as a power grab by mr. morsi. does it seem that most people understand that and does it make a difference at all? >> reporter: no. they reject that position by mr. morsi, and that explains the outrage. dramatic scenes in tahrirr square, including alexandria and port sayid. these are reminiscent of what we saw last year. it was then aimed at then president hosni mubarak. today the fury is aimed at mr. morsy. >> they were throwing rocks and monthly taf cocktails. the security forces shooting tear gases in the air. very similar scenes to last year. a similar slogan as well, fred. last year we heard the protests, the slogan, leave, leave, leave. we're hearing it again today. people saying they're not
where we were before. >> brown: among the protestors in cairo were two men who ran against mr. morsi-- hamdin sabbahi from the leftist al- karamah party, and constitution party founder mohamed el- baradei, who tweeted yesterday that morsi had appointed himself "a new pharaoh." in his decree, morsi also held out the possibility of a second trial for hosni mubarek for the killings of protestors. >> suarez: to explain why morsi took these steps and the reaction that followed, i'm joined by nathan brown, an expert on egyptian constitutional law and politics. he's a professor at george washington university. do you find it significant that this wasn't just tahrir square but alexandria, port said. >> oh, yes. essentially most of the non-islammist political forces in egypt-- that is the brotherhood and others aside-- have lined up against us. the real question is are they going to be able to form a united front? and do they have any strategy by which to overturn morsi's decisions. >> suarez: what exactly has he done through these decrees? what did he say-- what powers did he give to himself
or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions, the liberals, the secularists, women's rights groups, the youth groups. essentially, their position is that we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he rescinds his decrees, and we spoke to one of his
here, and when you talk to them, they say they're determined to stay here until mr. morsi, the president, heeds their call. they're the peaceful protesters. at times this morning things have gotteningly. a number of clashes sparked by young men, teenagers, who seem to be out looking for trouble. what happens is they start throwing rocks at police officers. police officers respond by firing stun grenades. you may have heard a few of them a few seconds back, and we've had that type of daj russ cat and mouse game going on in the past few hours here in tahrir square here. >> there's been a call for pro-morsi demonstrations. we know there's the big one on tuesday. anything before that? >> reporter: even today according to a spokesperson for the muslim brotherhood there are demonstrations to show support for the president and his decrees, and it's so important to point out that the muslim brotherhood and president mohammed morsi have an incredible amount of support in this country. the muslim brotherhood is maybe the most powerful political movement, and that's why you have this
the scene for us this morning and how important mr. morsi is in the solution we see here. >> reporter: yeah, christine, this is another critical day in this conflict. a lot of people anxious to see what happens in the coming hours. it's a little after 12:00 noon cairo time and in a couple of hours secretary clinton is scheduled to arrive in cairo meeting with the egyptian president mohammad morsi as well as the arab league. whenever big conflicts happen in the middle east, washington wants to be seen as playing a major role as peacemaker. that is clearly why mrs. clinton is in the region today, but it is also clear that throughout the past few days it's been egypt that's taking the lead as peacemaker. obviously, they have strong links to hamas and they also have links with israel with that peace treaty they have promised to abide by. so they seem to be logical peacemaker. yesterday they were optimistic that a cease-fire would be established. mr. morsi says he expects the aggression to stop. obviously, christine, that didn't happen. heavy fighting throughout the night and the early morning h
there are a lot of questions about mr. morsi and where he really stands and with whom he's really allied. president obama, he said during the campaign that he wouldn't -- he raised the question about whether egypt was still an ally. then today he said the report was that he reaffirmed our close partnership with egypt, and what news do you make of that? what are they trying to tell us with that statement? >> they may be trying to send a signal. it was only two months ago in a television interview the president was asked whether he considered egypt an ally and he suggested no. president morsi has a lot of proving to do essentially in terms of governing. the white house fully aware president morsi is a member of the muslim brotherhood. there are a lot of questions around the world whether he will play a constructive role in this. the white house used the word partnership with egypt. they are stopping short of calling him an ally perhaps because of the fact they are trying to hold a stick over him. you have got republicans on capitol hill talking in recent days about cutting off u.s. aid fro
the positioning and navigating she has to do in her meeting with mr. morsi. >> soledad, we can report to you that, according to the u.s. embassy here, secretary clinton has arrived here in cairo and she's going to be meeting with egyptian president mohamed morsi very soon. with the violence escalating, the spotlight, the pressure is on secretary clinton and washington. the u.s. seems to be broadening its role. the key role the u.s. is going to play here is with its sway over israel. obviously, israel and washington are best friends. washington has a lot of influence with israel. but the problem is, washington does not have a relationship with hamas. the u.s. sees hamas as a terrorist group, of course. i think that's where egypt could play a significant role here. look for secretary clinton to push egypt, its president, mohamed morsi, to get hamas to make some concessions to possibly hammer out a cease fire. yesterday egyptian officials were optimistic that a cease fire would come. today, it's not the case. all parties here seem to be continuing the push to hammer out some sort of truce while the
, obama found in his phone calls that mr. morsi recognized the danger of an escalating conflict. in the long run as the united states have an expanded role in what is going on over there? guest: in the end without some american intervention or leadership role, it is very difficult to envision a genuine comprehensive peace. the parties have to want it. and it is clear. part of the problem for mr. obama is that when he came to office the first time around, he did make that a central issue. he appointed senator mitchell as the first envoy. it was a priority position for him. and he did not get anywhere. in part, the in the arm it was really good for it. more importantly, the government really did not cooperate with him as he had expected. and the relationship between the prime minister and obama was not very good and has not been a very good. this is an opportunity for the israelis to rebuild it now that he has won reelection. it is no secret that the israelis preferred to see met romney become president. that was an issue. but he felt he did a lot and did not get anywhere. the eco
they are able to pull that off. in the longer term it's a real balancing act for mr. morsi. here on the streets he has a population strongly in support of the palestinians but he's got to keep the peace. to keep the peace he's going to get western investments and see this economy going. we are seeing evidence of that balancing act behind me off in the distance, a small crowd of protestors teargassed a few moments ago and we could expect larger numbers on the streets tomorrow, gregg. gregg: thanks very much. ainsley: what does the cease-fire mean? what does the end game mean in the middle east. jonathan sanzer the founder of defense for democracy and the author of hamas vs. fatah, the struggle for palestine. happy thanksgiving to you. >> thank you. happy tkpapbghappen happy thanksgiving. >> i think the israelis and hamas are both claiming victory. the israelis got what they were looking for long range rockets smuggled in see a sudan. they took out all the rockets. for hamas 4 they were able to fire rockets into the israeli heartland. i don't think they will be able to do it to the extent of this
with mubarak. we are going to oust him. >> now today mr. morsi and the muslim brotherhood are scheduled to meet with the judges, the supreme judicial council, that's one of the groups that his decrees undermine. the problem is, there is no dialogue to get to the leaders of some of the other oppositions. >> and more than $4 billion as well and the judges are threatening to strike. so even with all of that, no decision for morsi to revoke that decree? >> well, we just spoke to one of his senior advisers, and he seemed to suggest that he might consider it, but many will say that if he backs up, it would be a politically wrong move for him. that it will be a sign of weakness. for now, there are no indications from his office that he wants to reverse the decree. >> and reza, just as we were going on air israel's defense minister ehud barak resigned. how could this affect today's talks between israel and hamas? >> it's not clear how ehud barak's resignation is going to impact these talks. but i doubt these talks are going to fall apart the decision for a cease-fire last week were made by the top offi
. >> the president said a month ago he didn't know whether egypt is our ally or not. >> we'll see. mr. morsi was involved in the ceasefire. but i think it is up to him now to demonstrate that he is going to stand with us, going to hohn 0or that peace treaty with israel that is so important to u.s. interests in the region, and actually facilitate what all of us would like to see there which is freedom for more egyptians. >> politically morsi seems clearly to be siding with hamas in that conflict. was he just playing for a certain element in egypt? because behind the scenes he was working with us to broker a peace. >> he is of the muslim brotherhood party. it is a party steeped in some of the very, very anti-western, anti-american ways. hamas has the same roots so it is a political situation that's very challenging but we look to him to be a leader and come down on the side of freedom and to recognize israel's right to exist as a jewish state in the region. that's what we're going to look for especially when he is coming to the white house which will come to congress to look for taxpayer aid f
the president yesterday to provide an update. mr. obama also spoke with egyptian president morsi and praised his efforts to ease tensions in the region. the white house says president obama supports israel's right to teefd itself but that he wants td situation resolved quickly as possible. >>> today the president takes his first overseas trip since winning re-election. mr. obama will head to southeast asia for a four-day visit and attend a summit in cambodia as well as stop in thailand. he will be the first u.s. president to visit myanmar where he'll meet with democratic activist aung san suu kyi. >>> this morning leaders in congress say they are optimistic they can reach a deal that would avoid the upcoming so-called fiscal cliff. the president and house leaders showed confidence after a closed door meeting on capitol hill. the republican house speaker john boehner and democrat house minority leader nancy pelosi expressed confidence but neither said how the talks are progressing. the president insists the way to handle it is to tee cease taxes as scheduled for individuals making less than $250,
president mohammed morsi an underscore necessity for hamas that the united states consider aster rorrist group. mr. obama talked to the israeli prime minister to get update on the situation. many analysts say unless there is a cease-fire in 48 hours it's uncertain there will be an escalation. shannon? >> shannon: david lee miller live in israel. thank you. we are going to look at the reasons that israel is striking back against gaza furiously right now. national security correspondent jennifer griffin puts the story in per speculative. >> the gaza conflict may be phase one as they prepare for strike against iran nuclear program. conventioconventional wisdom isy will strike back. >> our problem is not our border with gaza, but other country's boarder with gaza. access of the arms that come from iran through sudan. among rockets fired at us come directly from iran. we know the hamster rorrist trained with iranians. strong connection. >> they can reach tel aviv and jerusalem from gaza. in the past year, they smuggled components for the rocket through tunnels from each of the desert to gaza.
president morsi, closed the deal as this official said. they also praised secretary clinton saying that she did an exceptional job. but again going back to what they are saying as mr. obama was very directly involved. one of the things also, wolf, that they're pointing at that i think will prove to be very important is this burgeoning relationship with the egyptian president morsi. i mean, just think of it. just a short time ago he was the new man on the block, muslim brotherhood, lots of doubts about him. and now look at the words that the president used. there's a lot of praise for his personal role in bringing about this cease-fire. that could go a long way. in fact, they say that he was very pragmatic. that's president morsi, very pragmatic. they developed a relationship they say based on trust and were able to work through these issues. so down the road that's going to be important, wolf. >> basically the bottom line in all of this is that the u.s. is also, jill, provided some assurances to both the israeli government of prime minister netanyahu and the egyptian government of president
, secretary clinton did call the foreign minister of egypt, mr. amr, and tried to get some clarification. they discussed this not only this political issue of president morsi, but the issue of gaza, where he played a very important role, and that is why secretary clinton was in that region, just last week. but the -- there is concern and let's listen to what the spokesperson for the state department, victoria newland, had to say about it. >> it is a very murky uncertain period in terms of the legal and constitutional underpinnings, which makes it all the more important that the process proceed on the basis of democratic dialogue and consultation. >> so if it is murky, they are watching it very, very closely. in fact, one thing that victoria nuland said, the right people are talking to each other. that's good news. they want this to happen, number one, peacefully, and number two, democratically. and, you know, brooke, on another issue that funding the imf, of course, just reached an agreement with egypt on some badly needed funds that they needed, and there is a question also here in the
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)